SoloSEO

International SEO in 1 minute

Posted by Michael D Jensen on April 7th, 2008

International SEO International SEO has been a topic at recent SEO conferences, and one that we’ve discussed here before. One aspect of doing International SEO is having your content available in other languages. Hiring a translator to translate your blog is cost prohibitive for most bloggers, running $50-$250 for each language per post.

Although no automated translator is perfect, Google has come up with a great translator, perfect for translating your blog. Of course the translation won’t be as accurate as a real translator, but if you can’t afford that, this service is better than nothing at all.

Lucky for all of us, there are several WordPress translator plugins. The best one I have found and implemented (see the flags on the right sidebar) for our own blog is the Global Translator Plugin for WordPress by Nothing2Hide.net. Some of the advantages are:

1) Easy to install, just unzip, upload the folder, turn it on, and check the settings (under Options).

2) SEO Friendly URLs! For example, http://www.soloseo.com/blog/it/ goes to the Italian version of our blog, and http://www.soloseo.com/blog/it/2008/04/07/international-seo-1-minute/ is the URL to this post (notice just the /it is added). Your blog posts will start to show up on other versions of the search engines, and hopefully start generating some traffic, subscribers, and conversions!

3) Caching – Instead of going out to Google Translator every time the post is viewed, it will cache the translation.

Of course there is more to do than just getting content into different languages, but it is certainly a great place to start with International SEO.

So if you want to take that first step into International SEO, start with getting your existing content translated into several other languages!

Update – 403 Forbidden Errors

After posting this and letting it go overnight, it appears that Google does not like its translation service being used every hour! (we were getting 403 Forbidden Errors for all translated pages) Luckily the service has several options built-in, and so I opted for using AltaVista’s Babelfish service. The translation works fine and I don’t get the 403 Forbidden Error page instead of my translated blog pages. Hopefully Google will let us use their service more, I will probably try it again and change the interval to every 24 or 48 hours.

3 comments Visited 4626 times April 7th, 2008 Michael D Jensen

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  • Entry Filed under: SEO

    3 Comments

    • 1. International SEO in 1 mi&hellip  |  April 8th, 2008 at 3:53 am

      [...] NO NO NO I was reading soloseo and that quote I disagree with and agree with ! [...]

    • 2. Jordan McCollum  |  April 8th, 2008 at 9:33 am

      While using a machine translator from Google or Babelfish might enable you to get a rough, word-for-word translation of the page up, that translation may or may not be intelligible to a native speaker of that language (and if it is, they may think you’re an idiot).

      For example, here’s the English to Italian to English translation of the first paragraph of this article:

      International SEO has been a argument to the recent SEO conferences, and about what we have discussed before here. One aspect of doing International SEO is having your content available in other languages. An aspect to make International of SEO is that your content available in other languages. Hiring to translator to translate your blog is cost prohibitive for most bloggers, running $50-$250 for each language for post. Renting a translator in order translate yours blog it is the proibitivo [yes, it will leave words it can't understand in the original language in tact] cost for the greater part of the blogger, the execution of $ 50 – $ 250 for every language for every post.

      Additionally, a machine can’t tell you what keywords real Italian speakers are using. Are real Italians searching for “SEO” or “Ottimizzazione del motore di ricerca”? Personally, I have no idea. But there’s no guarantee that putting up a page with a machine translation will guarantee any more visitors from that country if they aren’t looking for any of the phrases on the page.

    • 3. Michael D Jensen  |  April 8th, 2008 at 9:45 am

      Jordan, you’re exactly right. I tried to convey that its not perfect but maybe its better than nothing at all. :) Also, the translation you read is probably not as good as the Google one because I had to switch it to BabelFish because of the 403 errors I was getting. :) You’ll have to try out the Google translator and see if that bumps it up a notch in quality.

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